Employees want to add value… so let them!

Is your team clear on what they need to do and why? And if not, how do you think that’s impacting your bottom line? Maybe it’s time to wipe the canvas clean, assess current-state versus desired-state and get everyone on the same page.  

Many times I’ve come across teams or people doing tasks simply because they were asked to (sometimes years ago!) and no one has told them the task is no longer required so of course they keep doing it.

It’s a pretty safe bet that you can think of an instance like this… maybe a report gets manually entered, generated or printed – but the data, process or outcome has changed over time and it’s no longer adding value or needs to be updated to truly be meaningful.

Or maybe a role in your team remains only because the person occupying the role is a valued member of the team and you don’t want to lose them… even though the tasks they complete, no matter how competently, are getting surpassed by technological advances or other change initiatives.

Guess what… employees want to be adding value! They strive to do a good job and produce meaningful work. If they’re not adding the value you think they could be – maybe it’s time for a clarity session. Going back to the drawing board and identifying expectations, accountability, change management, and aligning to the bigger picture – your company’s strategy, mission and purpose.

This is NOT about finding cost synergies and downsizing, making people ‘do more with less’. This is about going through an important exercise in order to increase productivity, efficiency and engagement. It’s about identifying and playing to people’s strengths – setting people (and the team) up to succeed.

By having clarity around their role in a team and ultimately the organisation – your employees can be empowered, proactive and assess if what they’re doing is actually adding value. So let’s embrace a continuous improvement mentality … as a manager you can have a go at this yourself, or you can get someone (cough, cough, maybe me) in to run the sessions from a non-biased perspective.

Initiating a discussion is a good way to get the ball rolling. But it needs structure and guidance if it’s going to be successful. I’ve got a number of tools and templates to guide this process and keep it on track. Also, you can focus on your job as a leader, as well as being a willing participant (this can be a time-consuming process if you’re not familiar with it). 

A clarity coaching session guides you and your team through a people-friendly approach to establishing or restructuring tasks, roles or functions. It can (and should) be delivered in a non-confrontational, non-threatening manner and focuses on growth, development and contributing to the achievement of the team and organisations’ wider strategy.

See how this could be of benefit to you and your team? Connect today to find out more.

The very first step when engaging employees

Do your employees have clarity around why their job even exists? What lens are they looking through when viewing your organisation’s culture?

This fundamental first step when engaging employees begins, either deliberately or unwittingly, before they even start their first day with the organisation. It actually starts during the recruitment and onboarding process.

Employee engagement on the whole is made up of a range of different factors or drivers. With some drivers weighting more than others depending on the environment, team and the individuals. However, one of the key drivers of employee engagement that all organisations should be able to nail, is clarity of purpose.

I agree with Simon’s Sinik’s sentiment that organisations which provide their people something to work towards are more likely to engage employees rather than just giving them something to work on. As Simon says, “If the leader of the organisation can’t clearly articulate WHY the organisation exists in terms beyond its products or services, then how does he expect the employees to know WHY to come to work?

Research shows that giving employees clarity of purpose and connection with end-goals substantially increases productivity and effectiveness – helping navigate towards success.

Employees with clarity and purpose not only approach their own tasks with more enthusiasm and dedication, they frequently go the extra mile to be helpful and courteous to their colleagues and more dedicated to the organisation. Fostering strong employee engagement and strengthening organisational culture.

After working in recruitment for a number of years, I understand the temptation of painting a picture that doesn’t accurately align with reality – just to get the ‘right’ people in the door. I also know how if feels to be sold a job or an organisation that doesn’t end up fitting the picture I was led to believe. You’re not doing the organisation any favours by getting people in the door under false pretences (or wishful thinking). And for an employee – it’s disengaging.

Checking in with employees, at any stage of the employee lifecycle, and asking a few simple questions about the lens in which they view why they do what they do, and what value they’re adding, helps managers accurately assess perception and then articulate the actual purpose of the organisation, the team and the individual.

Don’t underestimate the power of starting a meaningful conversation around clarity of, and connection to, purpose. It’s an important driver all managers should have on their employee engagement checklist.  

Top 3 reasons people leave

While pondering over 3 of the top reasons people leave a job or organisation, it’s easy for me to draw on my own experiences. It reinforces just how powerful connection and interaction with people in our work-life really is.

1.     Manager – I’ve left 2 jobs because of “creative differences” with my manager/leadership team. It’s important to note that one of these jobs provided a great salary package and benefits.

2.     Co-workers – I’ve desperately wanted to leave 2 positions because of “differing opinions” with colleagues. My productivity was low, absenteeism at an all time high, and my energy was zapped by those difficult interactions – leaving me tired and anxious even at home.  

3.     Purpose – out of the 5 organisations I’ve been employed by, the one I connected with the most was the one I knew, with crystal clarity, what their purpose was and how my job directly aligned with that purpose. I knew why I was going to work and what we were achieving together. A very powerful (and successful) combination.

The first two points above have nothing to do with my actual job/tasks/position and everything to do with connection (or rather disconnection) with those around me. The third point, while it may not seem like it at first, actually has everything to do with the person steering the ship.  

Contact me if you’d like to talk more about the real reasons your people are walking out the door.